Hyperplasia | Susan G. Komen® - ductal hyperplasia without atypia in breast

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Understanding Your Pathology Report: Atypical Hyperplasia (Breast) ductal hyperplasia without atypia in breast


Understanding Your Pathology Report: Atypical Hyperplasia (Breast) When your breast was biopsied, the samples taken were studied under the microscope by a specialized doctor with many years of training called a pathologist.The pathologist sends your doctor a Last Revised: March 9, 2017.

In these conditions, cells in the ducts (the pipes of the breast that drain the milk out to the nipple) or lobules (the parts of the breast that make milk) are growing faster than normal, but the cells look normal. Doctors call these conditions: ductal hyperplasia (without atypia) complex fibroadenoma; sclerosing adenosis; papilloma or.

Hyperplasia is a benign (not cancer) breast condition. It doesn’t usually cause any symptoms, such as a lump or pain, and is usually found by chance. Hyperplasia happens when there’s an increase in the number of cells lining the ducts or lobules of the breast. When hyperplasia occurs in the ducts it’s called ductal hyperplasia.

In usual hyperplasia (the most common form of hyperplasia) the proliferating (dividing) cells look normal under a microscope. Women with usual hyperplasia have about twice the breast cancer risk of women without a proliferative breast condition. Atypical hyperplasia. In atypical hyperplasia, the proliferating (dividing) cells look abnormal.